Author Archives: Operation Maths

Maths by Month – May (updated 2020)

A new month is just upon us, and as usual, this heralds the latest installment in this series of posts designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis.

As teachers and families, around the country, continue to support children via distance learning, to contribute to this effort in some small way, we have launched a new series of posts entitled Dear Family. Each of these posts, will focus on a specific maths topic, and provide practical suggestions as to how families can support their child’s learning, as well as links to useful digital resources. We hope that, in some small way, they may prove to be beneficial, both now, and in the future.

The posts in the Dear Family series published to date, focused on the topics of weight, capacity, 2-D shapes and 3-D objects, some of which also feature in the plans for this coming month (see below). The next posts, currently in development, focus on the topics of number sentences and equations, money and chance.

Please feel free to share any of the Operation Maths blog posts with colleagues and members of your school community, whether they are Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month or Dear Family blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.

Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for May:

  • May the Fourth Be With You! International Star Wars Day (May the fourth) is almost here!
  • Outdoor Classroom Day is May 21 2020. This global event encourages us to use the outdoors to teach, explore and learn. There are lots of resources with suggestions for all subject areas, including maths, https://outdoorclassroomday.com/. For more ideas for outdoor maths you could also check out:
    • the Maths Around Us activity ideas in your Operation Maths book
    • the Maths Around Us videos accessible at https://www.edcolearning.ie/
    • this post, Maths fun in the sun

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


Dear Family, your Operation Maths guide to 3-D Objects

Dear Family, listed below are some practical suggestions as to how you might support your children’s understanding of the maths topic of 3-D objects. Also below, are a series of links to digital resources that will help both the children, and you, learn more about 3-D objects. The digital resources are organised according to approximate class level.

Junior Infants to Second Class
You can also find class specific tips at the back of your child’s Operation Maths At Home book, for infants to second class, and in the Operation Maths Dear Family letters for third to sixth class.

Practical Suggestions for all Children

  • Naming shapes: 3-D is short for three dimensional, i.e objects with length, width and depth/height. In Operation Maths we refer to them as 3-D objects, so as to distinguish them from their flat, 2-D relations. 3-D objects can also be referred to as solid shapes and they include cubes, cuboids, spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids, etc. Distinguishing between 2-D shapes and 3-D objects can be a bit confusing for both adults and children; for example, the shape of a real ball may be referred to as a circle, since, if a ball is drawn, or shown in a picture, then the flat, 2-D shape of the ball in the image is now a circle! But in reality, it is a 3-D object called a sphere. And a box is not a 2-D shape, it is a 3-D object called a cuboid, but the flat surface of a box is usually the 2-D shape of a rectangle or, sometimes, a square. So, if looking for 3-D objects at home, ask the children to examine and if possible pick up, actual objects, as opposed to flat representations of the shapes in a picture book or magazine.
  • 3-D Shape hunts: Play games like “I spy, with my little eye, something the shape of a cube, cuboid, sphere” etc. Again, be careful that you affirm with your child that it is the entire object that you are looking at, as opposed to just a surface or a flat face of the object.

Lindor Cornet Milk | Products | Lindt Chocolate World

Waffle cone 3D model - TurboSquid 1434894

Order Cadbury Drinking Chocolate 250g Online at Special Price in ...Quality Street tubs shrink again as new chocolate added to mix ...

Tesco in second cut price blunder as thousands snap up discount ...

Champions of Design: Toblerone

Maltesers - Wikipedia

  • Sweet! A great place to find 3-D shapes is in treats and their wrappings or containers. Next treat time, look carefully at your Maltesers (spheres), Toblerone box (triangular prism), Smarties container and Lindor chocolates box (both hexagonal prisms), tub of Quality Street (octagonal prism) Starburst/Opal Fruits (cuboid), mini-rolls and hot chocolate powder (both cylinders) and wafer cones (cone, of course!)
  • Properties: Each family of 3-D objects also has properties or characteristics that make them different from other 3-D objects. In the younger classes, the children will be exploring whether a 3-D object can roll, stack, slide etc. When out and about or helping around the house, children can be asked to name the 3-D objects that are easier to stack on shelves in the shop, in the cupboard etc? What 3-D objects might roll off a shelf? As the children get older, they will be exploring properties such as the number of corners (also called vertices), the number and type of edges (straight or curved), and the number and type of surfaces (flat faces or curved surfaces). Through developing a better understanding of what makes an object that 3-D object, the children can start to group 3-D objects with similar properties or characteristics together.
  • Take it apart! 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, as mentioned earlier, are very connected. Another way that children can explore this relationship is to take apart examples of 3-D objects. Boxes are ideal for this, so, before you put your boxes in the recycling bin, ask your child to tear it open along an edge so as to open it out flat and identify the 2-D shapes that make it. This is referred to as the 2-D net of a 3-D object. Did they see the 2-D shapes they expected to see?
  • Play, play, play! Encourage your child to play and explore with 3-D objects as much as possible:
    • Lots of the toys that are aimed at preschool age children focus on 3-D shapes: wooden building blocks, shape sorter toys etc. Even older children can return to these toys and look at them in a new way to see what they can now discover and say about these shapes.
    • Magformers , Geomag and 3-D puzzles are examples of toys specifically geared towards the construction of 3-D structures. Other toys that can be used to create 3-D structures include Lego, K’nex, Mega Bloks, Plus-Plus and Stickle Bricks/Bristle Blocks.
    • Build anything! Use boxes and any objects from around the home to build, stack, etc. Without even realising it, the children will be exploring and learning about the properties of these shapes.
    • Solve 3-D puzzles. Perhaps you have a Rubik’s Cube somewhere around the house? Or look out for other 3-D puzzles like Rubik’s Cage, Soma cube or Tetris Shake. Any of these these type of puzzles are a very worthwhile way to spend time!

Digital Resources for Infants

NUMBERJACKS | Sphere Today, Gone Tommorrow | S1E3 - YouTubeThe Number Jacks have quite a number of 3-D shape-based episodes including Sphere today, Gone tomorrow, a Circle at both ends (cylinder) and Boxing Day.

3D Shapes Song | Shapes for kids | The Singing Walrus - YouTube3-D Shapes Song: Introduces cone, cylinder, cube and sphere.

Solid Shapes - YouTube

3-D Solids: A video lesson from Matholia introducing common solid (3D) shapes, including cubes, cuboids, cones, cylinders, spheres and pyramids. 

IXL | Maths and English Practice

Solid Shapes: A selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription. Activity L1-L7 are all about solid, 3-D objects.

3-D Sorting: Find the matching shape and sort the shapes (doesn’t require the children to know the names of the shapes)

Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.

Digital Resources for First and Second Classes

NB: Children in first and second may also enjoy the links for infant classes, above

Describing and Naming Solids - YouTubeDescribing and Naming Solids: A video lesson from Matholia describing the properties of common solid (3D) shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone and sphere. 

What 3D shape am I?What Shape am I? Use the clues to identify the name of the 3-D object. Guess the name before you click on to see the answer.

How to Draw 3D Shapes - YouTubeDrawing 3-D Objects: Video to show how to draw 3-D objects. Drawing is a great way to understand these shapes better.

IXL | Maths and English Practice3-D Shapes: A selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription. Activity N1-N10 are all about 3-D shapes.

Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.

Digital Resources for Third to Sixth Classes

NB: Children in these classes may also enjoy the links for first and second classes, above

Math is FunMaths is Fun: Background information on 3-D solids as a part of geometry. 

Shapes: 3D shapes - BBC Teach

3-D Shapes: Lots of useful information about 3-D shapes from BBC Skillswise, including a video highlighting 3-D shapes in the real world.

Learn Alberta - Interactive Math - Gail MooreShapes under the Sea: Answer questions on 3-D shapes to collect crystals and complete the game (also has a 2-D shapes topic).

Interactive whiteboard activity3-D Sorting lesson: Sort the shapes according to the required property. At the end click on answer to see if you are correct.

Unit 11 3-D Shapes, Weight, Volume & Capacity - Mrs. Warner's ...Mission 2110 – 3D Shapes: You need to know the properties of 3D shapes if you are to complete your mission in this exciting game.

Cube Nets - Content - ClassConnectCube Nets: Can you predict which of these nets will form a cube? Make your prediction and then watch the animation to see if you were correct.

What shape will I make? Look at the net and type in the name of the 3-D object it will make.

IXL | Maths and English Practice

IXL: A selection of geometry games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

Kangaroo Hop Power your kangaroo by recognizing shapes. How many ...Kangaroo Hop: Get your kangaroo to the finish line first by choosing the correct 2-D or 3-D shapes.

Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.

3-D shape quiz: For 5th or 6th class or those looking for a challenge! 


Dear Family, your Operation Maths guide to 2-D Shapes

Dear Family, given below is a brief guide to understanding the topic of 2-D shapes, as well as some practical suggestions as to how you might support your children’s understanding at home. Also below, are a series of links to digital resources that will help both the children, and you, learn more about 2-D shapes . The digital resources are organised according to approximate class level:

Junior Infants to Second Class
You can also find class specific tips at the back of your child’s Operation Maths At Home book, for infants to second class, and in the Operation Maths Dear Family letters for third to sixth class.

Understanding 2-D Shapes

Why do children need to learn about shapes? Learning to recognise different shapes not only helps children learn about this maths topic, but, in the early years, it also develops their ability to recognise numbers and letters by their shape. This skill will also transfer to other signs and symbols, be they maths symbols such as +, =, <, > etc., or signs and symbols in the real world e.g. road signs, safety signs etc.

Naming shapes: 2-D shapes is short for two dimensional shapes, i.e. shapes with length and width, but not depth/height. Also called flat shapes, these include circles, squares, rectangles, triangles etc. 2-D shapes can be a bit confusing for both adults and children; for example, a real ball is not a 2-D shape, it is a 3-D object called a sphere, but if a ball is drawn, or shown in a picture, then the flat representation of the ball in the image is now a circle! And a box is not a 2-D shape, it is a 3-D object called a cuboid, but the flat surface of a box is usually the 2-D shape of a rectangle or sometimes a square. So, if looking for 2-D shapes at home, ask the children to examine the flat surface of objects and/or to look at the flat shapes in a picture book or magazine.

Properties of Shapes: 2-D shapes also have properties or characteristics that make them different from other 2-D shapes. A shape with three straight sides and three angles (also referred to as corners or vertices) is always a triangle…but as the children get older they will also realise that some triangles have three equal sides (equilateral), some triangles have only two equal sides (isosceles) and some have no equal sides (scalene). Through an understanding of what makes a shape that shape, the children can start to group shapes with similar properties or characteristics together. So, if exploring 2-D shapes, draw the children’s attention to properties such as the number and type of sides (equal, not equal, straight or curved), the number and type of angles/vertices (equal, not equal, right angles or not).

Children in the senior end of primary school will further classify shapes into named groups, for example, they will identify different types of triangles, polygons (any shape with straight, non-curved sides) and quadrilaterals (four sided shapes, quad = four) and explore the different properties (size/shape of angles, length of sides) that make each one unique. They will learn more detailed terminology about the parts of shapes, especially the parts of a circle. They will also be asked to solve various problems (for example finding the measure of an unknown angle or side) based on what they know already. This is preparing them for the type of geometry they will meet in second-level maths.

Practical Suggestions for Supporting Children

  • Shape hunts: Play games like “I spy, with my little eye, something the shape of a rectangle” etc. Again, be careful that you affirm with your child that it is the surface or face of, for example, the door, that is a rectangle, not the entire door (which is in fact another cuboid i.e. a 3-D object). Look out for 2-D shapes on posters, road signs, billboards, wallpaper and in picture books. With older children, encourage them to notice that while each shape group has a key feature in common, each individual shape is different; for example while every triangle must have 3 sides, they also can have different size angles and sides. Look around for different triangles!
  • Play, play, play! Encourage your child to play and explore with 2-D shapes as much as possible:
    • Make 2-D shapes with sticks, string, playdoh, pastry, creating imprints in sand, mud, pastry, etc. Use construction toys such as Lego, K’nex, Geomag and Plus-Plus to create 2-D shapes and then build them further into 3-D structures.
    • Draw 2-D shapes and cut them out, create pictures, patterns, designs etc. Perhaps you have a spirograph toy somewhere in the house? Dig it out and give it a spin (excuse the pun!).
    • Solve shape puzzles. One of these are tangram puzzles. This ancient Chinese 7-piece puzzle, provides an excellent way to develop a child’s ability to manipulate and visualise shapes. You can often buy reasonably priced plastic or wooden tangram puzzles in local book and toy shops. You can also print out a set of trangram pieces and use them to solve the numerous puzzles available on line. Or you can play an interactive tangram puzzle game.
    • Other very worthwhile shape puzzles include tetrominoes (like the Tetris game of old) and pentominoes. You can also download games, based on many of these shape puzzles to your device; just search your app store for tangrams, tetrominoes/tetris and/or pentominoes.
  • Programming If your child does programming, or is interested in trying it out, they could use a free programme such as Scratch to draw various types of 2-D shapes.

Digital Resources for Infants

The Number Jacks have quite a number of 2-D shape-based episodes including Round and Round, Square Dancing and Very Shapely.


Shapes Songs Collection Vol. 1" - 35 Mins of Baby, Toddler ...Shapes Songs Collection: a collection of songs that teach children the names of common shapes.

 


Types of Shapes - YouTube2-D Shapes: A video lesson from Matholia introducing common flat (2-D) shapes, including squares, circles, triangles and rectangles. 


Shape Monsters – new learning game | The Topmarks BlogShape Monsters: an ideal introduction to 2-D shapes for young children. Children need to feed the monsters with the correct shapes. The monsters then say the name of the shape they’ve eaten.


Manipulatives | CoolMath4KidsPattern Blocks: Make numerous designs, pictures etc with these interactive pattern blocks. You can also choose a puzzle to complete.

 


Geoboard | The Math Learning CenterGeoboard: Make lots of different shapes using this interactive geoboard, free from the Math Learning Centre.

 


Kids Tangram Game - Play for free on HTML5Games.com

Kid’s Tangrams: a simple version of the puzzle that would suit infants.

 


Shape Games | Graphing Games | Math PlaygroundConstruct it! A shape puzzle that starts off easy but gets more and more difficult.

 


IXL | Maths and English Practice

Flat Shapes: A selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription. Activity K1-K6 are all about flat, 2-D shapes.

 


Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.


For more links to shape videos and songs, click here.

Digital Resources for First and Second Classes

NB: Children in first and second may also enjoy the links for infant classes, above

Tangram Puzzles for Kids • ABCya!Tangrams: interactive puzzle pieces that can be rotated to complete the shape.

 


Shapes in Figures - YouTubeShapes in Figures: A video lesson from Matholia that explores the 2-D shapes in other figures.

 


Describing and Naming Shapes - YouTubeDescribing and Naming Shapes: A video lesson from Matholia describing the properties of common flat (2D) shapes, including squares, rectangles, triangles, circles, semi-circles and quarter circles.


2D Shapes - YouTubeWho am I? A video lesson where children have to identify the 2-D shapes from their properties and pictures. The shapes at the beginning are those relevant to first and second classes and the latter shapes are more relevant to 3rd class up.


* NEW * 2D Shapes What Am I Description Matching CardsWhat am I? Read the clue on the card; do you know what shape is being described? These are printable but they could also be downloaded, read out and answered out loud, without having to print.


Visit Thatquiz.org - ThatQuiz.That Quiz Shapes: lots of different options here; start with “identify” and chose the shape names and level of difficulty to suit.


Manipulatives | CoolMath4KidsPattern Blocks: Make numerous designs, pictures etc with these interactive pattern blocks. You can also choose a puzzle to complete.

 


Geoboard | The Math Learning CenterGeoboard: Make lots of different shapes using this interactive geoboard, free from the Math Learning Centre.

 


Shape Games | Graphing Games | Math PlaygroundConstruct it! A shape puzzle that starts off easy but gets more and more difficult.

 


IXL | Maths and English Practice2-D Shapes: A selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription. Activity M1-M5 are all about 2-D shapes.

 


Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.

Digital Resources for Third to Sixth Classes

NB: Children in these classes may also enjoy the links for first and second classes, above

Math is FunMaths is Fun: Background information on 2-D shapes as a part of geometry.


Matholia: Various video lessons from Matholia exploring the properties or characteristics of a rectangle, square, triangle, rhombus and trapezium.


2D Shapes - YouTubeWho am I? A video lesson where children have to identify the 2-D shapes from their properties and pictures. The shapes at the beginning are those relevant to first and second classes and the latter shapes are more relevant to 3rd class up.


2D shape who am I?What shape am I? This time you have to identify the shapes just from their properties. Make sure you guess before clicking on to see the answer!


Learn Alberta - Interactive Math - Gail MooreShapes under the Sea: Answer questions on 2-D shapes to collect crystals and complete the game (also has a 3-D shapes topic).


Visit Thatquiz.org - ThatQuiz.That Quiz Shapes: lots of different options here; start with “identify” and chose the shape names and level of difficulty to suit.


Visit Thatquiz.org - ThatQuiz.That Quiz Triangles: lots of different options here; to identify different triangles, to calculate the measure of the angles, perimeter, area etc. Just chose the options and level of difficulty to suit.


Shapes: 2D shapes - BBC Teach2-D Shapes: Lots of useful information about 2-D shapes from BBC Skillswise, including a video highlighting 2-D shapes in the real world.


Odd Squad: PienadoPienado: A 2-D shape adventure game where you need to use 2-D shapes, in various positions, to plug gaps in a forcefield. 


montevistatechlab / Kindergarten April 2016Shapes in space: Blast the space rocks by answering the question correctly.


Classifying Triangles by Angles and Sides | PBS LearningMediaClassifying Triangles: a video which shows how all triangles are not the same.


IXL | Maths and English Practice

IXL: A selection of geometry games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.


Kangaroo Hop Power your kangaroo by recognizing shapes. How many ...Kangaroo Hop: Get your kangaroo to the finish line first by choosing the correct 2-D or 3-D shapes.


Shape Archives - Maths Zone Cool Learning GamesMatching Shapes: A type of memory game.


Properties of shapes | 5th grade | Math | Khan AcademyKhan Academy – Properties of Shapes (5th and 6th class): Watch this series of videos on triangles and quadrilaterals and answer the practice questions


Math Game: QuadrilateralsI know it – Quadrilaterals: Interactive quiz


Coordinate plane | 5th grade | Math | Khan AcademyKhan Academy – Coordinates: (6th Class) Watch this series of videos and answer the practice questions


Visit Thatquiz.org - ThatQuiz.That Quiz Coordinates: (6th Class) From the options on the left hand side select identify/plot/both and quadrants I.


Polygon quiz: Name the polygons by dragging the names into the correct places.


Math Games: a whole suit of geometry games, for all class levels; choose the skill you want to practice.


Dear Family, your Operation Maths guide to Capacity

Category : Uncategorized

Dear Family, listed below are some practical suggestions as to how you might support your children’s understanding of the maths topic of capacity. Also below, are a series of links to digital resources that will help both the children, and you, learn more about capacity. The digital resources are organised according to approximate class level.

Junior Infants to Second Class
You can also find class specific tips at the back of your child’s Operation Maths At Home book, for infants to second class, and in the Operation Maths Dear Family letters for third to sixth class.

Practical Suggestions for all Children

  • Where possible allow your children to have opportunities for “water play”; this can be during bath time, playing in the sink when the washing up is done, having tea-time with a play tea-set, playing outside with a basin of water and containers, etc. Sand play, if available, should also be encouraged as children explore with “pouring” sand from one container to another.
  • In school, the children are enabled to compare, estimate and measure capacity. You can reinforce this at home by asking the children to use their visual sense of capacity to compare and estimate which bottles, containers etc., hold more or hold less. Collect a selection of various types of bottles and containers and, if possible, remove any telling labels. Ask the children to line the containers up in order, starting with the one that they think holds the least. Fill this one with water, and then pour this water into the second container.
    • Does all the water fit? If no, then the first container holds more than the second container.
    • If yes, does the water from the first container fill the second container to the same level? Then they both hold the same amount.
    • Or is there space left at the top of the second container? Then it must hold more than the first container.
  • When estimating capacity, do the children realise that height and/or shape is not always indicative of capacity i.e. a taller but skinnier container may contain less than, or the same as, a shorter container.
  • When investigating capacity, try to conserve water; have a large basin handy, or do the water-pouring over a closed sink or bath so that the water can be reused. Why not even investigate the capacity of various containers as part of water play in the bath or sink?
  • Draw the children’s attention to capacity labels on bottles and containers, especially l for litres and ml for millilitres. Even children who may not yet know that there are 1,000ml in a litre, can examine labels and can use their number knowledge to identify the one which holds the most/least. If the item does not have a capacity label, does it have a label for a different unit of measurement and why is this? (e.g. perhaps g or kg for weight).
  • Is it good value? Keep a close eye on the capacity of various items when shopping (whether it be in the shops or online): while you’d expect that a 3l bottle of drink would be twice the price, or slightly less than twice the price, of a 1.5l bottle of the same drink, you would not expect it to be dearer – yet that can sometimes be the case! So involve the children in checking the capacity of items to make sure that you’re getting the best value for your money!
  • Find the items around your home that measure capacity (these are often called measuring instruments): kettles; liquid detergent caps and dispensers; medicine cups, spoons and syringes; buckets and basins; measuring jugs. Look carefully at the measuring scale, marked usually along the side, and get the children to try out these measuring instruments for themselves.
  • Involve your child in measuring capacity when cooking and baking. If using recipes, ask the children to calculate how much of each liquid ingredient would be required to make half, double, etc., of the amount/dish.
  • Enlist the help of older siblings if available. As they explain and support the younger members of the family, they will also be developing and consolidating their own knowledge and skills, especially communicating mathematically.
  • Draw the children’s attention to any other situation where capacity needs to be considered eg water conservation around the home, how much water we should drink daily, putting liquid detergent in the washing machine, the capacity of the household bins, the amount of rain forecast, recommended dosage for various medicines, buying enough paint for a particular room, purchasing fuel (eg petrol, diesel, home-heating oil), etc.

Digital Resources for Infants

NUMBERJACKS | The Container Drainer | S1E20 - YouTubeNumber Jacks: The Container Drainer

 

 

Lemonade Lessons | Videos | Kids | PeepMaking lemonade: A video showing how some children used capacity as they made lemonade

 

Comparing Volume (Part 1) - YouTube

Full or Empty: A lesson from Matholia focusing on full and empty

 

Comparing Volume - YouTubeComparing volume: A lesson from Matholia which focuses on language such as greater than, less than, highest, lowest etc

 

Kindergarten: Which Container Holds More? - YouTube

Holds more or less? Video lesson

 

 

IXL | Maths and English Practice

Holds more or less: a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

Digital Resources for First and Second Classes

Describing Volume - YouTubeHalf full: video from Matholia showing how to describe capacity using “half full”.

 

Measuring Volume in Litres on VimeoMeasuring in litres: video from Matholia showing how to read the scale on a large container.

 

ictgames || html5 Home PageCapacity Countdown: Read the level of liquid on the scale and type in the capacity. Recommendation: Stick to litre and half litre option.

 

IXL | Maths and English PracticeHolds more or less: a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

Digital Resources for Third to Sixth Classes

Measurement IndexMetric Volume (capacity): Background information on volume (capacity) and litres and millilitres as the main metric units. At the end of the page there is a link to an activity, explaining how you could do some capacity activities at home.

 

Measuring: Capacity - BBC TeachCapacity: Lots of useful information about capacity from BBC Skillswise, including a video highlighting capacity in the real world.

Beginner m Measuring capacity and reading scales converted - YouTubeUsing measuring instruments: a guide to understanding the scales on measuring jugs and using them correctly and accurately.

Converting Millilitres to Litres and Millilitres - YouTubeConverting millilitres to litres and millilitres: A video lesson from Matholia.

 

ictgames || html5 Home PageCapacity Countdown: Read the level of liquid on the scale and type in the capacity. Recommendation: work through the given options in order.

 

Topmarks on Twitter: "In our Coconut Ordering game you can compare ...

Coconut Ordering Game: Select Capacity to order amounts of l and ml

 

Reading Scales - TransumReading Scales: An activity which checks your ability to read scales in various intervals.

 

BBC NEWS | UK | Q&A: Water meters and youWater Calculator: this resource helps you calculate the amount of water used in your household. (Not tablet friendly – requires Adobe Flash Player).

 

Math is Fun

The Jugs Puzzle: You have 2 jugs of different sizes & an unlimited supply of water. Can you measure the exact amount of water needed? Has six different levels.

 

IXL | Maths and English Practice

Metric Measures of Volume (capacity): (ie litres and ml) a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

 

 

OdlumsOdlum’s Baking with Kids: What better way to develop and perfect your measuring skills! 

 

Microsoft Educator Network Ireland – TeachNet Blog › MathGames.com ...

Comparing and converting metric units: Practice games incorporating metric units of weight, capacity and length.

 

Capacity Quiz: (for 6th class) Multiple choice quiz.

 


Maths by Month – April (updated 2020)

A new month is just around the corner, and as usual, this heralds the latest installment in this series of posts designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis.

This installment, however, is coinciding with a very turbulent and uncertain time in national and global history, as teachers and families around the country explore how best to continue to support children’s learning.

To contribute to this effort in some small way, we have launched a new series of posts entitled Dear Family. Each of these posts, will focus on a specific maths topic, and provide practical suggestions as to how families can support their child’s learning, as well as links to useful digital resources. We hope that, in some small way, they may prove to be beneficial, both now, and in the future. The first post in the Dear Family series focuses on the topic of weight, which all of the classes from third to sixth are likely to encounter in their Operation Maths books this month. Please feel free to share this post with members of your school community, whether Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month or Dear Family blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.
  • Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for April:

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


Dear Family, your Operation Maths guide to Weight

Category : Uncategorized

Dear Family, listed below are some practical suggestions as to how you might support your children’s understanding of the maths topic of weight. Also below, are a series of links to digital resources that will help both the children, and you, learn more about weight. The digital resources are organised according to approximate class level.

Junior Infants to Second Class
You can also find class specific tips at the back of your child’s Operation Maths At Home book, for infants to second class, and in the Operation Maths Dear Family letters for third to sixth class.

Practical Suggestions for all Children

  • In school, the children are enabled to compare, estimate and measure weight. You can reinforce this at home by asking the children to use their outstretched hands to compare and estimate the heavier/lighter of any two items, from anywhere around the house. Do they realise that size is not always indicative of weight? i.e. a bigger item (e.g. beach ball) may be lighter than a smaller item (e.g. a book).
  • The children can then check their estimate by using a handmade balance, assembled quickly from a clothes hanger and two identical bags.
  • Draw their attention to weight labels on food packaging, especially kg for kilograms and g for grams. Even children who may not yet know that there are 1,000g in a kg, can examine labels and can use their number knowledge to identify the heavier/lighter item. If the food item does not have a weight label, does it have a label for a different unit of measurement and why is this? (e.g. ml or l for capacity).
  • Is it good value? Keep a close eye on the weight of various food items when shopping (whether it be in the shops or online): while you’d expect that a 4kg bag of potatoes would be twice the price, or cheaper even, than a 2kg bag of the same potatoes, you would not expect it to be dearer – yet that can sometimes be the case! So involve the children in checking the weight of bags and packages to make sure that you’re getting the best value for your money!
  • Involve your child in weighing and measuring when cooking and baking. Show them your kitchen/digital scales (if you have any); demonstrate how it works and get the children to try the scales out for themselves. If using recipes, ask the children to calculate how much of each ingredient would be required to make half, double, etc., of the amount/dish.
  • Do you have any other weighing scales at home? Bathroom scales, luggage scales etc? Allow the children to explore how they work and use them to measure the weight of the bags used by the household: school bags, handbags, rucksacks etc.
  • Enlist the help of older siblings if available. As they explain and support the younger members of the family, they will also be developing and consolidating their own knowledge and skills, especially communicating mathematically.
  • Draw the children’s attention to any other situation where weight needs to be considered: weight requirements for children’s car seats, weight restrictions on baggage with airlines, weight restrictions when posting letters and parcels, etc.

Digital Resources for Infants

Homemade balance: This video shows how you can easily set up a balance at home using a hanger and two bags.

 

Bert and Ernie - Heavy and Light - YouTubeHeavy and Light with Ernie & Bert: The Sesame Street favourites explore heavy and light.

 

NUMBERJACKS | Getting Heavy | S1E8 - YouTubeNumber Jacks: Getting heavy

 

Comparing Mass (Part 1) - YouTube

Comparing heavy and light objects: A lesson from Matholia

 

Measuring Mass (Non-standard Units) - YouTube

Measuring Mass (weight) using blocks: A lesson from Matholia. You could do this activity at home using the homemade balance above.

PBS Kids | Peep and The Big Wide World Games | PBS Kids Games ...Bunny Balance: Add bunnies to the see saw to make it balance or to make either side heavier or lighter (Not tablet friendly – requires Adobe Flash Player).

Moving Day: Fill the moving day truck, first with the lighter items, then the medium items and finally the heavier items. (Not tablet friendly – requires Adobe Flash Player).

IXL | Maths and English PracticeLight and heavy: a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

 

Digital Resources for First and Second Classes

Measuring Mass in Kilograms - YouTube

Measure Mass (weight) in kilograms: video from Matholia explaining how to compare the weight of items to 1kg using a balance (you could try this at home using the homemade balance idea in the infant section above).

Using a Scale - Kilograms - YouTubeUsing a scale to measure kilograms: A video lesson from Matholia

 

Mostly Postie - mobile friendlyMostly Postie: Lift the items onto the scales and type in the weight. Recommended: Stick to kg and half kg option.

 

Heavy or Light - Units of Measurement Game | Turtle DiaryHeavy or Light: Click on each item to weigh it. Then select the heavier or lighter item.

 

Game | Happy Camel | PBSUtah.org Happy Camel:  a puzzle game where you must find out where the toy is hidden.

 

IXL | Maths and English PracticeLight and heavy: a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

Digital Resources for Third to Sixth Classes

Measurement IndexMetric Mass (weight): Background information on weight (mass) and grams, kilograms and tonnes as the main metric units. At the end of the page there is a link to a Weighing Activity , explaining how you could do some weighing activities at home.

Converting Grams to Kilograms and Grams - YouTubeConverting grams to kilograms and grams: A video lesson from Matholia

 

Mostly Postie - mobile friendlyMostly Postie: Lift the items onto the scales and type in the weight. Recommendation: work through the given options in order.

 

Topmarks on Twitter: "In our Coconut Ordering game you can compare ...

Coconut Ordering Game: Select Mass to order amounts of kg and g

 

IXL | Maths and English PracticeMetric measures of Mass: (ie kg and g) a selection of games from ixl.com. You can do a number of free quizzes each day without having a subscription.

 

OdlumsOdlum’s Baking with Kids: What better way to develop and perfect your weighing skills! 

 

Microsoft Educator Network Ireland – TeachNet Blog › MathGames.com ...

Comparing and converting metric units: Practice games incorporating metric units of weight, capacity and length.

 

Weight Quiz: (for 6th class) Multiple choice quiz 

9 Weights: A challenging, interactive puzzle from nrich.org

 


Maths by Month – March (updated 2020)

Welcome to the March installment in this series of posts designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis, giving teachers greater insights into the concepts at hand, when they are most relevant.

While each monthly overview will specifically zone in on the Operation Maths topics for that particular month, the information and suggestions will be relevant to ALL primary teachers, whether they are Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Pssst! The Edco Primary Publications launches for 2020 will be taking place around the country during March and April. As well as launching their new programmes, Litriú an Lae and My Learner ID, they will also be showcasing Explore with Me, Let’s Talk Literacy, Bua na Cainte, Operation Maths, Number Facts and other Edco publications. Click on the link above for more information and to register.

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

Teachers of Infants to Second Class: if you have not yet recorded the results of the Operation Maths End of February Assessments please check out the Excel Record Spreadsheets to accompany the assessments in the Assessment Booklets; if you have any suggestions for how to improve these, please leave them here.

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.
  • Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for March:

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


Maths by Month – February (updated 2020)

Welcome to the February installment in this series of posts designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis, giving teachers greater insights into the concepts at hand, when they are most relevant.

While each monthly overview will specifically zone in on the Operation Maths topics for that particular month, the information and suggestions will be relevant to ALL primary teachers, whether they are Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

Teachers of Infants to Second Class: before you administer, score and record the results of the Operation Maths End of February Assessments please check out the Excel Record Spreadsheets to accompany the assessments in the Assessment Booklets; if you have any suggestions for how to improve these, please leave them here.

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.
  • Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for February:

  • Lá ‘Le Bríde, is Saturday February 1st. The story of St. Bridgid’s Cloak could be used as springboard into a pattern activity, or a discussion on exponential growth with older students.
  • Ireland’s first game in the 2020 Six Nations (against Scotland in the Aviva Stadium) is on Saturday 1st February. Some mathematical possibilities:
    • With older children, use the opportunity to explore the rugby union scoring system, and to identify what scores (up to 30, for example) are possible (how?) or impossible.
    • Calculate the number of games to be played; what if the competition had less or more teams, how many games would need to be played then?
    • Use the language of chance to discuss the possible outcomes for each nation in the competition and recognise that while it is impossible to predict the actual outcomes, we can use of knowledge of the teams performances to make informed predictions.
    • Calculate the dimensions of the pitch
    • Run a Fantasy Rugby League in your class
    • Make score predictions for each match and plot how these scores would be recorded on the Six Nations Table
  • Storytelling Week runs from 1-8 February. While this is primarily a UK based event, it does serve as a timely reminder of the rich role that mathematical stories can play in the early years.  For teachers of infants to second class, be sure to check out the Literacy suggestions within the Integration section of each short term plan in the TRB.
  • Valentine’s Day is Friday 14th February. Try out these themed problems  and challenges (suitable from first class up) from Mashup Math and, from the Routty Math Teacher, this selection of five Valentine’s Day-inspired starters, that are sure to engage your students and get them thinking critically about maths.
  • Pancake (Shrove) Tuesday is Tuesday 25th February. Recipes naturally provide great opportunities for real world maths, for example identifying the measures and amounts required, adding the correct measures to the mix, adapting the recipes to suit more or less people, etc. For more maths-related activities check out these pancake problems.

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


Maths by Month – January (updated 2020)

Happy New Year!

And welcome to the first post for this calendar year, but the fifth post of this school year, designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis, giving teachers greater insights into the concepts at hand, when they are most relevant.

While each monthly overview will specifically zone in on the Operation Maths topics for that particular month, the information and suggestions will be relevant to ALL primary teachers, whether they are Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

Psst! Teachers of Infants to Second Class: if you have not yet scored and recorded the Operation Maths End of December Assessments please check out the Excel Record Spreadsheets to accompany the rest of the assessments in the Assessment Booklets; if you have any suggestions for how to improve these, please leave them here.

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.
  • Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for January:

  • Chinese New Year (Year of the Rat) starts on Saturday 25th January. Children in older classes could be encouraged to explore the Chinese numeration system and to challenge each other to translate standard numbers into Chinese numerals.
  • Backward Day! The 31st of January marks this little-known celebration which encourages us to reverse or invert the typical societal rules. Without encouraging anarchy, there are obvious opportunities here to explore symmetry, mirror writing etc.
    • Challenge your class to write out the capital letters of the alphabet backwards; not only starting with z but writing each letter as flipped image of itself, as shown.
    • Ask them to consider in advance which letters might appear the same when flipped backwards and what letters will appear different.
    • The children’s letters can be checked using small plastic mirrors to see if the image in the mirror is correct.
    • The children can also be asked to do the same thing with the digits 0-9 or even bigger numbers.
  • While it’s not guaranteed, there could be snow! The Routty Math Teacher has a whole library of Solve it Friday puzzles many of which align themselves with feasts and seasons. Sign up here to get access to the library and then check out weeks 16-19 for snow-themed puzzles.

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


Maths by Month – December (updated 2019)

Welcome to the fourth installment in this year’s series of posts designed to explore the Operation Maths topics on a month-by-month basis, giving teachers greater insights into the concepts at hand, when they are most relevant. While each monthly overview will specifically zone in on the Operation Maths topics for that particular month, the information and suggestions will be relevant to ALL primary teachers, whether they are Operation Maths users or not.

HINT: To ensure you don’t miss out on any future Maths by Month blog-posts, please subscribe to the Operation Maths blog via email, on the top right hand of this page.
Another way to keep up to date an all new maths-related developments is to like/follow the Edco Primary Maths page on Facebook and/or Twitter 

Operation Maths for Junior Infants to Sixth Class:

HINT: Teachers of Infants to Second Class – don’t forget to use the Operation Maths Assessment Records on excel for recording and collating the End of December Assessments

Operation Maths users can also access a class specific, month-by-month list of relevant links and online resources via the Weblinks document, accessible on www.edcolearning.ie. 

  1. Log into your edcolearning account
  2. Click on the At School Book/Pupil’s Book for your class level.
  3. Click on the Edco Resources icon (on book cover image on left-hand side)
  4. Select Weblinks from list of categories and then click to download the document.
  • Also accessible on  www.edcolearning.ie.  are the custom-made digital resources to support these topics. These will all be viewable when you click on the Edco Resources icon as directed above.

HINT: If you are new to Operation Maths this year or have changed class level, be sure to check out the Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths books and the companion Quick Start Guide to the Operation Maths Digital Resources
Don’t forget that Operation Maths also has you covered for planning whether you’re teaching a single class or multi-class. 

Other suggestions for December:

  • This year, Computer Science Education Week runs from 9-15 December, during which time, they are also encouraging everybody, young and old, to engage with their annual Hour of Code event.  Coding is the future! Computers are changing every industry on the planet. Every 21st-century student should have the opportunity to build technology. Click on the links above to access Hour of Code and other computer science activities for learners of all ages. Operation Maths users can also access the tailor-made Operation Maths Scratch lessons on 
  • NRICH have recently launched their 2018 Primary Advent Calendar. They have lots of other Christmas-themed activities that can be accessed here: https://nrich.maths.org/public/search.php?search=christmas. They also have an Advent-themed sudoku challenge that some of the more-able senior class pupils might like to tackle.
  • Mash-up Maths have a Christmas-themed 12 Days of Holiday Math Challenges. Suitable for 1st class up, it might be better to hide all the puzzle initially. Then, reveal just one line at a time and ask the children to record and justify all the possible solutions based on what they know at that point. As they move through each line, they can then justify why they should now discard certain options. This is a better way to engage all of the children in thinking mathematically, rather than it just becoming a race to the solution (which can often turn-off those less mathematically-inclined). For more of this type of problem sign up to the Mash-up Maths weekly newsletter, to receive lots of other themed maths puzzles and challenges like this Grinch-themed challenge.
  • Interested in more Christmas-themed maths problems? From Dec 1-24 the German Maths Society posts a daily problem (in English) on its online Advent Calendar. There are 3 levels of difficulty, 4th class to adults.

We’re here to help!
If you have any questions on Operation Maths, Number Facts or anything related to primary maths over the course of the school year, please PM or contact Edco Primary Maths via Facebook and/or Twitter 


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